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  • #40609
    Binx
        • Topics: 117
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        • Practcally Cretan
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        There are tree like plants growing near road sides , they have a cannabis looking leaf and long mauve little flowers.

        A person I know keeps saying it is a cannbis tree, I argue it is a type of budlea, if anyone can put a name to the plant / tree I would appreciate it.

        Compare hotel prices and find the best deal - HotelsCombined.com
        BullionVault

        #41035
        Del Boy
            • Topics: 28
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            If this person you know has enlarged pupils and a wide smile, then he or she could be right.
            or it might be a chaste tree, ancient Greeks used the leaves… they say the mixture made them feel sexy, stop and smell the plant and let me know how you get on.
            If you feel sexy roll yourself a joint and hit the town.

            #41340
            Jovana
                • Topics: 33
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                • BIC Full Member
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                Member since: 22nd April 2010

                Hi, the plant you describe is known as ligaria ([ch955][ch965][ch947][ch945][ch961][ch953][ch940]).  It grows near water in general and I don’t think its anything to do with Canabis, although the leaves are similar.  Look it up under its Greek name on google, and you’ll see pics.  If you look it up on Wikipedia in English, the pictures are not so good, but under the Greek equivalent they are clear and the entry gives botanical name.

                :)

                #41572
                Binx
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                    Thank you so much Jovana, your information is of big help.xx

                    #41746
                    Barbaraki
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                        • BIC Junior Member
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                        Member since: 31st March 2010

                        I found this: the flowers smell a bit like
                        lavendel

                        Vitex agnus-castus
                        From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
                        "Chaste tree" redirects here. This may refer to any species of Vitex.
                        Vitex agnus-castus

                        Vitex agnus-castus flowers with halictid bee, Hemingway, South Carolina
                        Scientific classification
                        Kingdom: Plantae
                        (unranked): Angiosperms
                        (unranked): Eudicots
                        (unranked): Asterids
                        Order: Lamiales
                        Family: Lamiaceae
                        Genus: Vitex
                        Species: V. agnus-castus
                        Binomial name
                        Vitex agnus-castus
                        L.
                        Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Vitex agnus-castus
                        Vitex agnus-castus, also called Vitex, Chaste Tree, Chasteberry, Abraham’s Balm[1] or Monk’s Pepper, is a native of the Mediterranean region. It is one of the few temperate-zone species of Vitex, which is on the whole a genus of tropical and sub-tropical flowering plants.[2] Theophrastus mentioned the shrub several times, as agnos ([ch940][ch947][ch957][ch959][ch962]) in Enquiry into Plants.[3] Vitex, its name in Pliny the Elder, is derived from the Latin vieo, meaning to weave or to tie up, a reference to the use of Vitex agnus-castus in basketry.[4] Its macaronic specific name repeats "chaste" in both Greek and Latin.

                        Confusion with Vitex on the part of early settlers in the West Indies may have given to Ricinus communis the name "Castor-oil plant".[5] Or the name "castor oil" might have come from its use as a replacement for castoreum.[6]

                        Contents [hide]
                        1 Cultivation
                        2 Garden history
                        3 Uses
                        3.1 Herbal medicine
                        4 Medical use
                        4.1 Mechanism of action
                        4.2 Chemical analysis
                        4.3 Current uses
                        4.4 Contraindications
                        5 Other uses
                        6 Links
                        7 References
                        [edit]Cultivation

                        Vitex agnus-castus is widely cultivated in warm temperate and subtropical regions for its delicate-textured aromatic foliage and butterfly attracting [7] spikes of lavender flowers in late summer in cooler climates. It grows to a height of 1–5 meters. It requires full sun or partial shade along with well-drained soil. Under ideal conditions it is hardy to USDA Zone 7, on the south shore of Long Island and Nantucket on the East Coast of North America and in the southwest of England.

                        [edit]Garden history

                        This section is empty. You can help by adding to it.
                        [edit]Uses

                        Vitex, also a traditional plant in Africa, is a little-known fruit plant that has potential to improve nutrition, boost food security, foster rural development and support sustainable landcare.[8]

                        [edit]Herbal medicine
                        The leaves and tender stem growth of the upper 10 cm (4 inches), along with the flowers and ripening seeds, are harvested for medicinal purposes. The berries are harvested by gently rubbing the berries loose from the stem. The leaves, flowers, and/or berries may be consumed as a decoction, traditional tincture, cider vinegar tincture, syrup, elixir, or simply eaten straight off the plant as a medicinal food.[9] A popular way of taking Vitex is on awakening as a simple 1:1 fluid extract, which is said to interact with hormonal circadian rhythms most effectively.[10]

                        The berries are considered a tonic herb for both the male and female reproductive systems. The leaves are believed to have the same effect but to a lesser degree.[9][10]

                        In ancient times it was believed to be an anaphrodisiac, hence the name chaste tree. Pliny, in his Historia Naturalis, reports the use of stems and leaves of this plant by women as bedding "to cool the heat of lust" during the time of the Thesmophoria, when Athenian women left their husbands’ beds to remain ritually chaste. At the end of the thirteenth century John Trevisa reports of it "the herbe agnus-castus is always grene, and the flowre therof is namly callyd Agnus Castus, for wyth smel and vse it maketh men chaste as a lombe".[11] Chaucer, in "The Flower and the Leaf," refers to it as an attribute of the chaste Diana, and in the 16th century the English herbalist William Turner reports the same anaphrodisiac properties of the seed, both fried and not fried. More recently, this plant has been called monk’s pepper in the thought that it was used as anti-libido medicine by monks to aid their attempts to remain chaste. There are disputed accounts regarding its actual action on libido, with some claims that it is anaphrodisiac and others that it is aphrodisiac. Because of the complex mechanism of action it can be probably both, depending on concentration of the extract and physiologic variables (see below).

                        [edit]Medical use

                        Clinical studies have demonstrated effectivness of standardised and controlled medications produced from extract of the plant in the management of premenstrual stress syndrome (PMS),[12][13][14] and cyclical breast pain (mastalgia).[15] The medication is recommended in Germany.[16][17]

                        [edit]Mechanism of action
                        The mechanism of action is not exactly understood[18] but it is assumed that it has dopaminergic effects resulting in changes of prolactin secretion. At low doses, such as might have been used in previous centuries for suppression of sexual desire, it inhibits activation of dopamine 2 recept

                        #41880
                        scooby
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                            Wow! enjoyed not reading that…

                            #41980
                            Jovana
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                                Member since: 22nd April 2010

                                Lygaria – Something you might like (even
                                Scooby) :)

                                Listen to this song in praise of Lygaria.

                                http://rapidshare.com/files/123162906/-_Track12.mp3.html

                                #42140
                                scooby
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                                    #42208
                                    Del Boy
                                        • Topics: 28
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                                        Member since: 24th August 2007

                                        I was looking for a topic that covers shit, this is about the nearest I can find..So can anyone tell me why Georgiopolis stinks of it.

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